INFORMATION FOR SCHOOL LEADERS

Principals and management teams have a key role to play in promoting and implementing emergency planning and preparedness.

Get ready – Plan

AS A SCHOOL LEADER, WHAT DO I NEED TO DO TO PLAN FOR AN EMERGENCY EVENT?

This information outlines leadership obligations, along with suggestions for engaging your community and where to get support, so that your school is better prepared for:

    • developing and reviewing policy
    • developing emergency response plans
    • inviting whānau and community members to the school to share learning experiences
    • involving the whole school in the teaching and learning around What's the Plan Stan?
    • considering the learning needs of all students, making sure that all students are able to feel safe and prepared
    • exploring these questions with the school community
      • What level of emergency preparation do the students in our school engage in?
      • How do we enable students in our school to be prepared for emergency?


LINKS WITH THE NEW ZEALAND CURRICULUM

What’s the Plan Stan? helps principals and management teams as they work with staff to plan curriculum-based education for managing emergencies.

What’s the Plan Stan? aligns with the vision, values, and principles of The New Zealand Curriculum. Emergency event education grows resilience and awareness and helps students connect to and participate with their community. In taking a localised approach, schools can focus on the emergency events that are most likely to happen in their area and spread the message of preparedness across the community.

What’s the Plan Stan? provides a framework for teachers to design learning opportunities that develop the key competencies. It offers authentic, wide ranging and increasingly complex contexts that challenge students’ ideas and responses.

Emergency event education fits well with the learning areas of health and physical education and social studies.

For more information about teaching and learning about emergency events, see Information for teachers

Get ready – Prepare

WHAT CAN I DO TO PREPARE FOR AN EMERGENCY EVENT?

Principals and management teams  lead their school in preparing for emergency events by:

    • arranging for the purchase, storage, and maintenance of emergency supplies and equipment
    • maintaining liaison with the Emergency Management Officer at your local council and with emergency services
    • ensuring training in line with the school’s emergency response plans
    • ensuring they and their staff have access to and are familiar with the resources provided by the Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management and by the Ministry of Education
    • supporting staff to implement and review curriculum-based emergency event education.

 MINISTRY OF EDUCATION RESOURCES:

Stan flying left grey.

 

MINISTRY OF CIVIL DEFENCE AND EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT RESOURCES:

It's happening – Drill

Practices and simulations help students and teachers become familiar with the actions they need to take immediately after an emergency event.

SCHOOL LEADERS CAN:

    • ensure that teachers, students, and whānau know the emergency procedures identified in the school’s emergency plan
    • plan for and manage drills that include the types of practices and simulations needed to prepare for emergencies.
    • For details about carrying out each type of practice and simulation, see the emergency event pages.
    • encourage teachers to use these drills as a prompt for teaching about why we have drills and what would happen in a real life emergency situation.

 

TYPES OF PRACTICES AND SIMULATIONS

Emergency response practice

Practise the immediate response that students and teachers should take in the case of a specific emergency. Example: Drop, cover, and hold during an earthquake. 

  • Helps participants know exactly what to do in case of a specific emergency event
  • Should happen at different locations – playground, class, hall.

Participants: Students, teachers, other school staff

Frequency: This should be done frequently at least once a term.


Evacuation exercise

Practice evacuating the school in case of an emergency event.

  • Can be combined with emergency response practice
  • Helps parents know exactly what to do if the school

Participants: Students, teachers, other school staff, parents/caregivers

Frequency: This should be done less frequently. We suggest once a year.


Emergency event simulation

Simulate the response of different people and response agencies in a simulated emergency event. Example: simulating the roles of different groups that can help after an earthquake. 

  • Allows students to find out the roles of different people and response agencies in an emergency event

Participants: Students, teahers, other school staff, agencies: Police, Fire, Ambulance, Ministry of Civil Defence and Emergency Management

Frequency: This should be done less frequently. We suggest once every two years

It's over – What now?

School management, Boards of Trustees, and Civil Defence can work together to help mitigate the impacts of emergency events.

AFTER AN EMERGENCY EVENT, PRINCIPALS AND MANAGEMENT TEAMS WILL:

    • identify the damage, remaining risk factors, and appropriate responses, referring to the school’s emergency plan and, when necessary, working closely with Trustees and Civil Defence
    • communicate with staff and students about the assessment of the situation and next steps
    • support staff and students to follow the appropriate procedures
    • communicate with whānau about the emergency event, the current situation, and the procedures to follow.

 

To help with planning, consider the impacts you could face at school. See Never Happens? Happens under What are the Impacts?